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The birth of a child often also arouses interest in one’s own early stages. It is interesting to know what the baby has been like. Relationships with one’s parents take on a new meaning with parenting. You can remember the nice things you thought of as a child and the experiences you now want to share with your own child. At its best, parenting is an opportunity to relive the positive experiences of childhood. Have a good reason to run down the stick, climb trees, play hide-and-seek or read fairy tales!

Every childhood also has unpleasant things. Experiences that you didn’t want to happen and feelings you didn’t want to know. These experiences are also activated through parenting. Sometimes difficult times or difficult relationships from childhood come to mind so much that it is good to stop. It can be important to give space and opportunity to explore feelings and experiences about your own childhood so that your own parent is not overburdened by disappointments or difficult relationships as a child or young person.

During the waiting period, you may want to explore your childhood again. You can use interviews with your loved ones to help. By asking about your childhood, you will be able together to return to the roots of your own life, your own memories and those of your loved ones. At the same time, you can think about what kind of future memories you want to offer your child.

If you have the opportunity to interview your parents or a loved one about your childhood, you can ask them, for example …

What was the time when you were expected?
How did your birth start and progress?
What was the moment of your birth and what do your parents remember about it?
What were your first days, weeks, months?
What kind of baby were you?
Who cared for you?
What made you baby, what made you laugh?
What did you not like or were you afraid of?
How did you sleep?
Who belonged to your family when you were born?
Did you have a “work title”?

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